Missed from Merstham

I originally described Merstham as “the unluckiest tower” as it appeared that only two members had served, and both had been killed. However, looking again at the Roll as published in the annual report a few days ago, I suddenly realised that that version named four more men from Merstham who had all survived the war. Two of these were the elder brothers of Ernest Morley, one of the two men from Merstham who were killed, Alfred and Horace Morley. All three brothers were living together in 1911 in the household of the eldest, Alfred, and his wife Elizabeth, at 89 Albury Road, South Merstham. Alfred (26) was a gardener domestic, Horace (17) was also a gardener, Ernest (14) a baker’s assistant. Alfred served in the Suffolk Regiment. Horace, joined the cavalry, serving with the 3rd Hussars for most of the war. After the war he joined the Tank Corps, and continued serving until 1926, when he returned to South Merstham.

Alex Frederick Cheasley served in the Royal Navy, finishing the war aboard the destroyer HMS Tower. He was born in Merstham on 9 December 1896, he’d been working as a postman until he joined up on 16 March 1916. William Henry Etherington was a chauffeur in 1911, according to the roll he served in the Royal Army Service Corps, but so far official records have not found for certain. There are several William Etherington’s to be found in the Army Service Corps, but nothing to tie any one of them to Merstham. There is even one William H Etherington, but his service number suggests he served in the Horse Transport section, rather than the Motor Transport section as would be expected for a chauffeur.

Thomas James Coppard (1871 – September 1925)

Thomas James Coppard (see also his page on Lives of the First World War) was the second child of Edward Coppard and Est[h]er Elizabeth nee Botting (the spelling of her name varies between sources as to whether the h appeared in Esther).

His parents had married at St Mary’s, Bletchingley on 30 May 1868, both were Bletchingley born and bred. At the time of their marriage, Edward was a general labourer, he could only make his mark, rather than sign, in the register. His father, Thomas, was also a labourer. Ester was the daughter of James Botting, a blacksmith, she could sign her name, but the rather scratchy and blotted signature doesn’t suggest a great deal of comfort in using a pen. Their ages are not given in the register, just that they were of “full age” (ie over 21). Their first child, Alice Hannah, arrived in early 1869, she was baptised in St Mary’s on 25 April 1869. The 1871 census was taken on 2 April, it was some time after that that Thomas was born, he was baptised at St Mary’s on 27 August.

The family was enlarged over the next few years with the arrival of Albert Edward (baptised 31 May 1874), Ellen Elizabeth (baptised 26 November 1876) and Kate Isabel (baptised 27 April 1879). At the 1881 census the family were living at Tilgate Cottages, Bletchingley. Edward was 36 and a general labourer, Esther, 38. More children followed over the next ten years, Minnie Gertrude (baptised 26 February 1882), Edwin George (baptised March 1885) and finally Charles Botting Coppard, born 24 November 1888 and baptised on 30 December.

At the 1891 census the family were still at Tilgate Cottages, Barfields, Bletchingley. Thomas was now 19 and working as a domestic groom. Alice Hannah, Albert Edward and Ellen Elizabeth weren’t in the family home, the rest of the children were still too young to work.

Thomas James Coppard and Mary Ann Jones married at St Mary’s on 30 December 1894. He was 23, and now a labourer, she was 19. Her father, William Henry Jones had been a labourer, but was deceased. The witnesses were Charles Overy and Alice Hannah Overy – Thomas’s brother-in-law and sister who had married just over a year previously on 26 December 1893. Thomas and Mary’s first child arrived just four months later, on 28 April 1895. He was hastily baptised (privately) on 29 April, but died the following day. He was buried in the churchyard on 4 May.

The following year, Louisa Annie Coppard was born to the couple on 3 June 1896, and baptised on 28 June. From the following year, Thomas begins to appear in the electoral registers, showing that they were living in Tilgate Cottages still (probably a different cottage to his parents though). A third child, Albert Henry, arrived on 6 February 1898, and was baptised on 24 April, he was followed by Francis James on 2 September 1899 (baptised 26 November). It was just over a week before Francis’s baptism that we have the first evidence so far found of Thomas as a ringer, when he is listed as ringing the third to a peal of Grandsire Triples at Bletchingley on 18 November 1899. He had presumably started ringing a little while before this, but no earlier reports have yet been found.

1900 brought more sorrow, with the death of a second child in infancy, with Albert Henry dying early in the year, he was buried in the churchyard on 1 February 1900. Their second daughter, Elsie Elizabeth, arrived on 18 February 1901. The 1901 census was taken on 31 March, the family are shown at 3 Tilgate Cottages. Thomas (now 29) is shown as a bricklayer’s labourer. No occupation is given for Mary, unsurprisingly given the recent birth of Elsie. Florence Gertrude (or May – Gertrude in his army record, May in the baptismal record) was born on 3 October 1903, and baptised on 29 October. She was followed the next year by Edward George on 30 October (baptised 29 January 1905), then Arthur William on 23 February 1907 (baptised 31 March) and Leonard Charles on 1 September 1908 (baptised 25 October). On the occasion of this last baptism, Thomas’s occupation is for the first time given as painter.

At the 1911 census the family were still at Tilgate Cottages, Thomas is listed as a house painter, no occupation is given for Mary, and the children were all still of school age except Lousia Annie who was working as a general servant for the Legg family at Newlands, Bletchingley. Archie Legg (28) is described as a grocer and draper, with him are his wife Ethel Kate, their son William Gregory (1) and Ethel’s younger brother William Geoffrey (15). They’d been married for 2 years, and had had another child who had died before the census. Later that year Thomas and James had another son, Richard Frederick, on 11 October 1911. In 1913 the family moved to Bank Cottages, Bletchingley. On 5 July 1914, their last child, Jack Stanley, was born – just under a month before the outbreak of war.

Thomas joined up at Reigate on 7 November 1914. He joined the 7th Supernumerary Company of the 2/5th Battalion, the Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment). Supernumerary companies were raised by several Territorial Force battalions, initially for those registered as part of the Territorial Force Reserve or National Reserve, little more than lists of men held by the county territorial associations of those who had previous military experience. Thomas states he had 8 years’ service with the Volunteers. No other evidence of this has yet been found, and the use of the term Volunteers implies it was prior to 1908 when the Territorial Force was created. The surviving portions of his record are rather sketchy, so it’s difficult to work out exactly what his service entailed especially for the first couple of years. The supernumerary companies were mostly employed on the defence of strategic points (such as railway bridges), and in guarding POWs. In late 1916 he was posted to 41 Protection Company as the supernumerary companies were brought together to form the Royal Defence Corps, his duties would have remained much the same. From a subsequent medical report it seems he has based at Barking around February 1917 and this was when he began to develop myalgia and rheumatism. A further reorganisation saw him posted to 6th Battalion RDC on 11 August 1917. On 24 August he was examined by No 4 Travelling Medical Board at Dovercourt (on the coast of north Essex) and placed in the medical category CIII (the lowest) – presumably he was based somewhere in that area at the time. On 27 February 1918 he again went before a medical board, this time an invaliding board at Felixstowe. This recommended his discharge on the basis of the rheumatism and myalgia he had developed back in February 1917. The board originally rated him at under 20% disabled, when his discharge was finalised this was set at 10%. As a result, rather than an ongoing pension, he was paid a lump sum of £37 15 shillings (this accounted for his disability and dependent children Florence, Edward, Arthur, Leonard, Richard and Jack). He left the army in London on 20 March 1918 after 3 years, 134 days service.

Despite is discharge on the grounds of ill-health he seems to have subsequently become a more active ringer than he had been previously. He rang a quarter peal on 14 May 1921 for the wedding of another Bletchingley ringer, C V Risbridger, seven of the eight ringers are listed on the roll of honour: G Kirby treble, S J Coppard [sic – but no ringer known with those initials, so presumably Thomas J] on 3rd, L F Goodwin 2nd, A Wood 4th, A Cheesman 5th, W Cheesman 6th, W J Wilson. Over the next three years he rang three more recorded pieces of ringing (each of Grandsire Triples), a quarter peal on 20 November 1921 (with G Kirby Treble, L F Goodwin 2nd, W J Wilson 3rd, A Wood 4th, T J Coppard 5th, F Balcombe 6th from the roll of honour), a peal on 12 May 1922 (with Gordon H Kirby Treble (1st peal), George F Hoad 4th, Albert E Wood 5th, Thomas J Coppard 6th all on the roll of honour) and a quarter peal on 28 October 1923 (with L Goodwin 2nd, W T Beeson junr 3rd, W Wilson 5th, T Coppard 6th from the roll of honour).

Thomas died aged 54 in September 1925 at Redhill Hospital and was buried in “Centre Old Cemetery”, grave reference D3, on 22 September 1922. Mary survived him and continued living at Bank Cottages, she died on 22 January 1933 and was interred in the same plot on 26 January.

Soldiers’ Effects Registers

Another new First World War source has recently been released on Ancestry. These are the Soldiers’ Effects Registers held by the National Army Museum, Chelsea. Until this digitisation partnership, the registers could only be accessed via a paid search through the museum.

They detail amounts paid out by the War Office following a soldier’s death. The registers show the soldier’s name, the unit with which they were serving at time of death, place of death, amounts paid out, and to whom. They can be very useful when the CWGC details are scant as the relationship to the payee is also shown. They also complement the probate records released previously, as they show the actual size of the estate. A recent free weekend on Ancestry gave a good chance to get to grips with these records (though I couldn’t get through all the records for association members killed in the war).

Looking through those on the roll who were killed we find the following additional or confirmatory details. For Sydney Reddick, his death is recorded as being at 136 Field Ambulance, using war diaries it should be possible to find a more exact location for this on the date of his death, it also shows that as indicated on his will, his mother was his sole legatee. John Webb’s entry offers nothing new, but confirms that all monies were paid out to his wife. For Sidney Frank Rayner we get the additional detail that he died in Preston Hall Hospital, Aylesford, Kent. This hospital specialised in men who had been gassed, or who were suffering with TB or other lung complaints. For Albert Arthur Stoner of Burstow there is no new detail, just confirmation that the payments were made to his father, Arthur. Similarly for Walter Eric Markey, the only new detail is of the payments to his father and mother. For Frank Pickering of Carshalton again we learn that all payments went to his parents as joint legatees (though no will has been traced). C H Schooling of St John’s, Croydon is the first officer to appear in the registers, the payees here are less clear, it seems they may be passed through his agents rather than directly to next-of-kin.

Next, Arthur Frederick Roberts of Godstone, the register shows payments to his mother as sole legatee of £10 19s 1d. For George Basil Edser of Hersham payments of £7 6s to his widow, Edna. Similarly for Joseph Abbott of Merstham entry shows payments to his widow, Lizzie, of £10 1s 10d, while that for fellow Merstham ringer, Ernest Morley shows £25 17s to his father, Henry.

For the Mitcham trio, starting with Douglas Walter Drewett, for whom there were payments of £20 15s 5d to his widow, Margaret. Then for Benjamin Arthur Morris, £28 5s 7d to his father Arthur. Finally, Stanley Smith, £5 5s 1d to his father William S Smith.

This was all I had time to look at. In the majority of cases so far, there was not a huge amount new, but the very first record for Sydney Reddick gave additional information on where he died which can be followed up in the war diaries.

First World War commemoration concert, Teddington 13/12/2014

Concert poster. All details are in the post belo

Concert poster. Thanks to Andrew Holmes for the photo of Ovillers Military Cemetery

On 13 December 2014 Twickenham Choral Society are giving a First World War centenary commemoration concert at the Landmark Arts Centre, Teddington, starting at 19:30. The programme comprises Domenico Scarlatti’s Stabat Mater, Iain Farrington’s The Burning Heavens (which sets several of Siegfried Sassoon’s war poems) and Ralph Vaughan Williams’ Dona Nobis Pacem.

As a 2nd tenor in the choir, I’ve written the programme notes for the concert. These look at the music in the concert, Vaughan Williams’ war service, and some of the effects of the war on the local area. In that context I’ve taken a brief look at the service of a few local men, and so I’ve smuggled in one of the men named on the Surrey Association roll of honour, John Harley Bridges Hesse (Kingston) as before he was commissioned in to the Army Service Corps he was a Teddington resident.

I’ve also created a community on Lives of the First World War to group together all the men whose service gets a mention in the programme. This also includes the choir’s second conductor, Charles Thornton Lofthouse who served as an officer in the Manchester Regiment.

Tickets are available via the Landmark Arts Centre website.

Able Seaman Alfred Bashford (19 November 1885-1 November 1914†)

A young man in a classic sailor's uniform. His cap tally shows his ship to be HMS Lion.

Bashford as pictured in The Ringing World on 11 December 1914. The photo actually dates from his service on HMS Lion between 21 September 1901 and 17 July 1902 when he was 16. (Courtesty of The Ringing World)

The second member of the association to die, Able Seaman Alfred Bashford, met his end half a world away from Walter Markey, aboard the ill-fated HMS Good Hope off Coronel in Chile.

Alfred was born on 19 November 1885 at Nutfield. He was the son of Alfred Bashford and Mary Harriett (nee Day). There is some evidence that he was usually known as Fred, presumably to avoid confusion with his father. Alfred was from Bletchingley and Mary from St Mary’s, Southampton, they married at St Peter and St Paul, Nutfield on 21 June 1879. William Day Bashford was born in 1880, baptised at St Peter and St Paul’s on 6 June 1880. Twins Allen Alfred and Annie Bashford followed in 1882, baptised on 9 April, but sadly died just two days later and were buried in the churchyard on 15 April. The 1911 census suggests two more children also died in infancy, but it has not yet been possible to identify them.

By the 1891 census the family were on Church Road, Nutfield. Alfred senior (53) was working as an agricultural labourer, William (10) and Alfred junior (5) were both at school and Mary (44) was a housewife. They also had a William J Bowley (21), a blacksmith, lodging with them. At this point there doesn’t appear to be any ringing in the immediate family, but there were father and son John Bashfords in Bletchingley, successively landlords of the Red Lion and well known ringers. By 1901 most of the family were still in Church Road, but Alfred junior was at Pattison Court Stables, and employed as a hall boy, presumably at Pattison Court itself which appears to have been the home of the Nickalls family. Alfred senior was still working as an agricultural labourer, William as a gardener.

On 16 September 1901 Alfred joined the Royal Navy as a Boy 2nd Class, his previous occupation is shown as “garden boy”. He was 5’4″ tall and described as of ruddy complexion with grey eyes and brown hair. He was briefly at the training establishment HMS Impregnable before being posted to HMS Lion on 21 September. He was re-rated as Boy 1st Class on 19 June 1902. He transferred to HMS Minotaur on 18 July, and to HMS Agincourt on 28 January 1903, and then briefly to HMS Camperdown from 17 April-5 May, joining HMS Hawker on 6 May. On reaching the age of 18 on 19 November 1903 he began his full 12 year engagement and was re-rated ordinary seaman. He had now grown to 5’6.5″. On 18 May 1904 he transferred to HMS Exmouth. He was re-rated able seaman on 5 April 1905. He was posted to the Portsmouth naval barracks, known as HMS Victory I, on 2 May 1905. He then went to a torpedo course on HMS Vernon from 14 May-23 September, before returning to Victory I until 28 May 1906. He joined HMS Centurion on 29 May, on 25 May 1907 he returned to HMS Exmouth. In 1908 he applied to buy himself out of the navy, in preparation for this he returned to Victory I on 28 June. After paying £12 and agreeing to join the Royal Fleet Reserve he left active service on 16 July 1908.

There are various reports of an A Bashford ringing during this period, but this is presumably the father. However, there is a report of a quarter peal of Grandsire Triples at Redhill on Sunday 11 October 1908 (which also included W Streeter, who also appears on the roll) featuring A Bashford, which is after Alfred junior left the navy. We can also see that William Bashford seems to be among a number of ringers you moved to Farnham to work at the plant nursery run by Charles Edwards, another ringer, as he is listed in several of the reports of ringing previously found in relation to John William Russell.

After this, no further reports of an A Bashford ringing occur until a one of 720s of Oxford and Kent Treble Bob on 11 March 1911 at Kingswood. This included A and W Bashford, along with J W Russell and W Cheeseman who also appear on the roll of honour. Following this there are a frequent reports, moving into quarter peals and peals. Several other men named in the roll of honour also appear in these. In several, Alfred is the conductor. He is often listed as F or Fred Bashford, and on some occasions this appears to have been incorrectly expanded to Frederick.

At the 1911 census the family were all living at High Street, the Village, Nutfield. Alfred junior and William were both working as labourers in the fullers earth quarry at Nutfield. Alfred senior was now a roadman on the highway.

In 1913 William emigrated to the US. He left Liverpool on the Mauretania on 22 March 1913 and arrived in New York on 28 March (see the Ellis Island records and UK records). He gave his occupation as gardener. As his intended residence in the United States he says he is going to a friend in Boston, Dr A P Nichols – one of the leading ringers in the US (it appears from some reports that there had been a deliberate policy of recruitment from England). William then appears in various ringing reports of the Boston ringers. In May 1914 he moved to Connecticut for a better job. In January 1915 William married a Miss Mulvenny, an event marked by ringing at Hingham, Massachusetts on 31 January.

Alfred senior died in late 1914.

In 1914 a mobilisation of the Royal Fleet Reserve was already planned for mid-July. This was given added urgency by the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand at the end of June. Alfred junior was posted to HMS Good Hope, an elderly cruiser activated from the Third Reserve Fleet, whose crews were mostly made up of reservists, on 13 July. There was a fleet review at Spithead, and then the reserves would have been demobilised, but in view of the international situation they were kept on active duty, but allowed leave. When the navy was fully mobilised on 31 July he returned to HMS Good Hope. Good Hope was assigned as the flagship of Rear Admiral Christopher Cradock. His squadron was despatched to the South Pacific to counter a German squadron under Maximilian von Spee.

The British squadron was composed entirely of outdated ships, and one converted from an ordinary merchantman. On 1 November the two squadrons sighted each other. Cradock, though he knew his ships were outclassed, decided to fight, possibly influenced by earlier events in the Mediterranean which led to Cradock’s friend Ernest Troubridge, who was now facing court martial after declining to engage with two German ship in somewhat similar circumstances. Good Hope was rapidly sunk, and soon followed by HMS Monmouth. Both sank with all hands, around 1600 men.

A memorial peal was rung at Nutfield on Wednesday 25 November. Today’s ringers remembered the centenary of his death with a quarter peal on 1 November 2014.

Mary Bashford was now about 67, a widow, with no children living nearby to support her. William Bashford returned from the US, arriving at Liverpool on 28 June 1915 aboard the SS St Paul. Having made the trip home, he met up with various old friends to ring throughout July at Nutfield and Merstham. He returned to the US, with his mother, again on the SS St Paul leaving on 31 July from Liverpool and arriving at New York on 7 August.

Walter Eric Markey (1895-31 October 1914†)

Walter Eric Markey was born in early 1895, or possible very late in 1894 at Bexhill-on-Sea. His birth was registered in the Battle registration district in the 1st quarter 1895. His parents, Alfred Eric Markey and Emma Elizabeth (nee Snook) were both originally from Somerset, Penselwood and Wincanton respectively. Their marriage was registered in the 4th quarter 1891 in the Wincanton registration district. Their first child, Cicely Emma, was born in Wincanton in 1893.

Walter followed in 1895, then Samuel Robert in Sidley, a small village on the outskirts of Bexhill. In 1900, Beatrice Mary was born back in Bexhill itself. By the time of the 1901 census the family were living at Keepers Corner, Burstow, Surrey. Alfred is listed as a coachman. In 1902 (Bessie) Minnie was born in Copthorne, and (Jessie) Margaret there in 1905. Elsie Gwendoline was born in Burstow on 20 November 1907, followed by Ethel Winifred in early 1911. By the time of the 1911 census the family were living at Shipley Bridge, Burstow, Surrey. Alfred was still working as a coachman, and Walter was now following in his footsteps, working as a groom.

Sometime, probably in the second half of 1913 (based on the number issued to him) Walter joined The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment), enlisting at the regimental depot in Guildford. By the outbreak of war he would have been a fully trained soldier, and went with the 1st battalion to France on 12 August 1914. They were heavily involved in the retreat from Mons and subsequent fighting. By 31 October 1914 the First Battle of Ypres was underway and the battalion was involved in the defence of Gheluvelt. The battalion was all but destroyed, with little more than a handful of men coming out of the line in early November. Walter was among those killed, his body was never recovered, and so he is commemorated on the Menin Gate. He was the first member of the Surrey Association to die in service.

The extent of his ringing career remains unclear, no reports of any ringing have yet been found. He presumably began ringing at Burstow in the years immediately before he joined the army. His death was not reported in the ringing press at the time, and does not appear to have been marked by the Burstow ringers. The only time his name does appear is in a report of a memorial service held at St Clement Danes on the Strand in London on 22 February 1919 for all the ringers killed in the war. As part of the service a roll of honour of ringers from “London and District” was read and he is listed as W Markey. Other services were held around the country on the same day, at Great St Mary’s in Cambridge, Sheffield Cathedral, Chester Cathedral, Winchester Cathedral and SS Philip and Jude in Bristol. Sadly, after this his name seems to have undergone a process of chinese whispers in drawing up the Surrey Association roll of honour, and this then fed into the Central Council roll of honour. Names were listed surname, followed by initial. Markey W seems to have been misheard at some point and transformed into Mark E W, which led to considerable problems in confirming his identity. Walter Markey seemed to be the only plausible candidate, but until the report of the memorial service was found this could not be shown beyond doubt, particularly as his unit is also incorrectly recorded as Royal Garrison Artillery on the Surrey Roll.

Ernest Attwater joins up

On 10 September 1914 Ernest Attwater’s attestation papers were formally approved by a major in the Royal Sussex Regiment. He had been medically examined at Haywards Heath (where he had been a member of the local Territorial Force company for three years prior to his move to London from Cuckfield) as early as 5 September, and had then completed the attestation papers at Chichester on 9 September. He was posted to 9th Battalion, one of the newly raised battalions of Kitchener’s New Army. He became Private 3305, but with his prior TF experience it’s no great surprise that he was promoted lance corporal as early as 12 October (NCOs were in short supply). He stated his age as 25 years, 220 days, and gave his occupation as carpenter and pro cricketer (he was on Surrey’s ground staff at the Oval).

It’s possible his brother Frank Norman joined up at the same time, but as he ended up in 3rd (Special Reserve) Battalion, it’s not absolutely clear (and his papers do not survive). Certainly both brothers were serving by 30 October when The Ringing World reported that Frank Norman was at Dover with 3rd Battalion, and Ernest was at Shoreham with 9th Battalion.

This would have been a blow for both Streatham towers, Immanuel an St Leonard, as with their other brothers, Louis and Isaac James, the Attwaters had become leading ringers in the area.